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Feb
28
Today at the Park
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Feb

28

56°F

Sunrise
06:32 AM
Sunset
05:46 PM
Tide

HIGH 4:47 PM


Low 11:04 PM

Park Hours and Info

Park is Open 7 Days a Week | 6AM - 1AM
Entry is Free!

Pier 28AM - 9PM* Pier 56AM - 11PM* Education Center3-5PM (TUE/THU), 1-5PM (SAT) Pier 6 Volleyball Courts6AM - 11PM Playgroundssunrise-sunset
Gardens

Pier 1 Salt Marsh

Location

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© Alexa Hoyer

How To Get Here

Open

Parking is limited, so we encourage you to take public transportation. And lucky for you, there are plenty of transportation options.

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Subway

2
3

Clark Street

A
C

High Street or Jay St- MetroTech

4
5

Borough Hall

F

York Street

Bus

B25
B61
B63
B67

B25 (at Fulton Ferry Landing), B61 (at Atlantic Avenue and Hicks Street), B63 (on the loop road near Pier 6 in the park), or B67 (at Jay Street and York Street)

CitiBike

Nearby CitiBike stations: Atlantic Ave & Furman St (Pier 6); Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 2; Old Fulton St (Pier 1); Water St & Main St (Main Street)

NYC Ferry

East River route to Dumbo/Fulton Ferry; or South Brooklyn Route to Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 6/Atlantic Avenue or DUMBO/Fulton Ferry.

Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Salt Marshes are planted with native, saltmarsh grasses that support coastal wildlife as well as protect the park from crashing waves.

The salt marshes are a rare example of a monoculture in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Here, Smooth Cordgrass replicate the exclusive plant communities that once dominated the coasts of the Northeast. Now a rare occurrence along the shoreline, the Cordgrass provides a habitat for ducks and other waterfowl that eat and live in the grass, along with many crustaceans and bivalves. 

Cordgrass dominates the salt marsh because it can withstand oxygen-constricting salt water. While most plants die when their roots lose oxygen, Cordgrass is able to move oxygen from its leaves to its submerged stems. As debris accumulates in the cordgrass over time, soil builds up above the waterline and creates habitat for less salt-tolerant plants. In a natural salt marsh this process builds new landmass that expands outwards into the ocean. At Brooklyn Bridge Park, we maintain this ecosystem as a salt marsh, removing the debris. 

Sunset over Pier 1 Salt Marsh and Pile Field.

© NS, Brooklyn Bridge Park

Pier 1 Pile Field and Salt Marsh with a view of Pier 2 in the background on a sunny day.

© Alexa Hoyer

Pier 1 Salt Marsh and Pier 2.
Pier 1 Salt Marsh and Pile Field at sunset. Pier 2 is seen in the distance.
Pier 1 Salt Marsh and Pile Field
Pile field and salt marsh at Pier 1 on a sunny day with view of Lower Manhattan in distance.

© Alexa Hoyer

Pier 1 Pile Field
View of Pier 1 Salt Marsh and Pile Field from the Greenway on a sunny day. Pier 2 is seen in the background.

© Alexa Hoyer

View of Pier 1 Salt Marsh and Pier 2 from the Greenway.
View of Pier 1 Salt Marsh and Pile Filed on a cloudy day. Lower Manhattan is seen in the background.

© BrooklynBridgePark/ERP

Pier 1 Salt Marsh and Pile Field

FAQS

Are there public restrooms?

How do I get to Brooklyn Bridge Park?

Is there a lost and found?

Is there Wi-Fi?

GARDENS AT BROOKLYN BRIDGE PARK

Pier 1 in the busiest entrance into the Park.

Pier 1 is the highest point in the Park, the peak is at 20ft.

The Pier 1 storm water containment tank has a capacity of over 100,000 gallons. The water is re-used for 70% of the park’s irrigation needs.

More than 13,000 timber piles support the piers in the Park.

20,000

participated in environmental education programs

Explore

365

Days Open Per Year

Explore

3,000

Trees in the park

Explore

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